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EmDrive: NASA’s FASTER THAN LIGHT propulsion technology finally passed peer review

Roger Shawyer, the UK scientist, is the pioneer of the new generation of power generation in space that would solve to some extent the limitations of space travel during the present times. He proposed this theory in 1999 and since then he had undergone through rough times and even branded as a fraud, even though, this research was entirely funded by Boing and the United Kingdom’s government.
This technology would be much better than what is used by NASA to power their rockets at present. Though the idea of this pioneering drive was met with some speculation and some, see this concept as an impossible task, if proven otherwise. The research paper on this second generation drive should be published soon as it has been accepted by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). It shall be published in their Journal of Propulsion and Power which is a society dedicated to space inventions.
Faster travel than the speed of light possible soon?
This controversial concept was fraught with controversies as it was considered as a Utopian dream, but an independent source has confirmed that the paper has been passed. The Eagleworks Laboratories at NASA is where this research was conducted; this is one of the favourite labs of NASA. This experiment on space thrust had gone through a rough journey, and there had been a lot of skeptics. EmDrive essentially means that electricity is converted microwaves and fired into a cone-shaped vacuum, as a result, the microwave molecules causes to create a force which results in a thrust.
He placed his theory as a theory of special relativity, but this theory is hotly debated by some scientists who do not believe that this theory is ever going to work. But Roger Shawyer is optimistic that his EmDrive will solve the problem of energy and also will speed up the travel in space considerably. Presently EmDrive is being tested for unmanned vehicles and flying cars.
Shawyer pushing ahead with EmDrive 2.0
Shawyer is now actively working on the next-generation EmDrive with an UK aerospace business and the new EmDrive is meant to be able to achieve tonnes of thrust (1T = 1,000kg), rather than just a few grams.
“We’re trying to achieve thrust levels that go up by many orders of magnitude, where the q values of the cavities are between 1 x 109 and 5 x 104. Once you reach the levels of thrust we anticipate we will reach, you can apply it anywhere,” he told IBTimes UK. “Essentially, anything that currently flies or drives or floats can use EmDrive technology.”
Original Source:  http://www.disclose.tv/news/emdrive_nasas_faster_than_light_propulsion_technology_finally_passed_peer_review/134779

This German Glass Sphere Will Revolutionize Solar Power On Earth Forever

Solar start-up Rawlemon’s Andre Broessel, a German architect, has created a spherical sun-tracking solar energy generator to revolutionise renewable energy and solar power on Earth. The Rawlemon design uses a spherical lens to concentrate both sunlight and moonlight up to 10,000 times on a small photovoltaic panel and combines this with a dual-axis pivot that tracks the movement of the sun. By concentrating the sun’s light in one area, the Rawlemon design reduces the solar cell surface required to just 1% of that required by a traditional panel making its solar harvesting capabilities 35% more efficient than conventional dual-axis photovoltaic designs. Additionally, poor weather would not impact the device, because of a built-in weather tracking system.

Rawlemon has brought a range of devices to market. The 10-cm (3.9-in) Beta.ey S phone charger is compatible with any phone that uses a USB 2.0 charging port and has a battery storage capacity of 27.5 Whr. The other devices include Beta.ey S Special Edition ($489) and a Beta.ey XL ($999) designed for charging tablets.

The 100-cm (39.4-in) Beta.ray 1.0 generate up to 1.1 kWh a day enough to run a laptop for about two days. It has a 1.8 kWh battery. The 180-cm (70.1-in) Beta.ray 1.8 generate up to 3.4 kWh a day enough to run a laptop for almost a week. It has a 5.4 kWh battery. Both the Beta.ray 1.0 and 1.8 feature water-filled acrylic-polymer lenses and generate thermal energy as well as solar. And there’s a $6,000 package too which includes the full-sized Beta.ray built for the outdoors.

He tried to raise $120,000 on his Indiegogo campaign for further testing, and for patent applications and raised $230,971 by March 10, 2014.

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The sports car that runs on SALTWATER

The sports car that runs on SALTWATER:

Vehicle goes from 0 to 60mph in 2.8 seconds – and has just been approved for EU roads

Quant e-Sportlimousine’s top speed is 217mph – equal to a McLaren P1
The car uses a saltwater flow cell system to power four electric motors
Water passes through membrane in tanks creating an electric charge
Two 200-litre water tanks can provide a range of 373 miles (600km)
The four-seater is 5.25 metres (0.4ft) long and 2.2 metres wide (7.2ft)
Price and sale date yet to be confirmed, but may cost more than £1m

By Ellie Zolfagharifard for MailOnline

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Sports cars may not have the best reputation for being environmentally-friendly, but this sleek machine has been designed to reach 217.5 mph (350 km/h) – using nothing but saltwater.

Its radical drive system allows the 5,070lbs (2,300kg) Quant e-Sportlimousine to reach 0-60 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds, making it as fast as the McLaren P1.

After making its debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show in March, the saltwater technology has now been certified for use on European roads.

Sports cars may not have the best reputation for being environmentally-friendly.But this sleek machine has been designed to reach an impressive 217.5 mph (350 km/h) – using nothing but saltwater

The 920 horsepower (680 kW) Quant e-Sportlimousine uses something known as an electrolyte flow cell power system to power four electric motors within the car.

It works in a similar way to a hydrogen fuel cell, however, the liquid used for storing energy is saltwater.

The liquid passes through a membrane in between the two tanks, creating an electric charge. This electricity is then stored and distributed by super capacitors.

Its drive system allows the 5,070lbs (2,300kg) Quant e-Sportlimousine to reach 0-60 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8s

After making its debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show (pictured) in March, the saltwater technology has now been certified for use on European roads. The car carries the water in two 200-litre tanks, which in one sitting will allow drivers to travel up to 373 miles (600km)

The car carries the water in two 200-litre tanks, which provide a range of up to 373 miles (600km). Inside is a full-length interactive dash, with wood-theme features and an Android-based entertainment system

Overall, the four-seater is 5.25 metres (0.4ft) long, 2.2 metres wide (7.2ft), the 1.35 metre (4.4ft).

Four-seater car is 5.25 metres (0.4ft) long, 2.2 metres wide (7.2ft), the 1.35 metre (4.4ft).

Its 22-inch wheels sit just beneath impressive double gull-wing doors.

The 920 horsepower (680 kW) Quant e-Sportlimousine uses an electrolyte flow cell.

It works like a hydrogen fuel cell, however, the liquid used for storing energy is salt water.

The liquid passes through a membrane in between the two tanks, creating an electric charge.

The 5,070lbs (2,300kg) car has a top speed of 217.5 mph (350 km/h) and reaches each 0-62 mph (100 km/h) in 2.8 seconds.

Its 22-inch wheels sit just beneath double gull-wing doors which feature ‘Chrystal Lake Blue’ paint.

Inside is a full-length interactive dash, with wood-theme features and an Android-based entertainment system.

No price or sale date has yet been revealed, but some experts suggest it could cost more than £1 million ($1.7 million)

NanoFlowcell AG, a Lichtenstein-based company behind the drive, is now planning to test the car on public roads in Germany and elsewhere in Europe as the company prepares for series production.

It claims the technology offers five times the energy capacity of lithium-ion batteries of the same weight.

‘We’ve got major plans, and not just within the automobile industry,’ says NanoFlowcell AG Chairman of the Board Professor Jens-Peter Ellermann.

‘The potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology.’
Introducing the QUANT e-Sportlimousine powered by salt
The saltwater technology offers five times the energy capacity of lithium-ion batteries of the same weight

‘We’ve got major plans, and not just within the automobile industry,’ says NanoFlowcell AG Chairman of the Board Professor Jens-Peter Ellermann. ‘The potential of the NanoFlowcell is much greater, especially in terms of domestic energy supplies as well as in maritime, rail and aviation technology’